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  • HOW TO DOCUMENT DOMESTIC ABUSE

    Documenting abuse can be a step in getting yourself to safety and out of an abusive situation. It can also help if you are planning on pressing charges against your abuser. If you think you may be the victim of abuse, please seek help from a Domestic Violence Advocate. If you are local (Fremont of Custer Counties) call us at 719-275-2429. Or you can call your local Crisis Center or the National Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. When documenting abuse, keep your safety as your number one priority. It is not uncommon for an abuser to hack into or monitor your phone, computer, email, and other online communications. This can make storing screenshots, pictures, and other conversations challenging. One suggestion is to open up a private email account on a computer at your local library and only access it there. That way your evidence is not compromised if your personal email address is being monitored. You can keep notes on each incident as well as pictures and screenshots. When documenting abuse, keep these 5 questions in mind: WHO? WHAT? WHEN? WHERE? HOW? Answer these in as much detail as you can. Consider things like threats, weapons, and objects used, witnesses, date, time, location, and exact quotes. Use words like hit, pushed, smacked, struck with an object (name the object used), or scratched when writing down what happened. Is the furniture overturned, vehicles damaged, holes in the wall, or the house in disarray? Write it all down in a safe, private email and send it to yourself through that same email address Sharing how the incident made you feel shows the impact it had on you. Take pictures of abuse right after is occurs as well as during the healing process. This shows proof of your injuries and can be used in court. Keep all photos in their original condition - no photoshopping or touching them up. Even touching them up for lighting needs to be avoided. Store them in your private email and delete originals from your phone. All hospital records need to be stored as well. Another item to keep track of is threatening texts. Do not respond to them. Screenshot and send these to your private email. If the abuser calls 40 times in a row, screenshot that as well. If the abuser calls, let it go to voicemail so their words can be recorded. Download the voicemail and save it in your private email. If possible, record verbal abuse on your phone while it is in your pocket. Only do this if you are sure the abuser will not be suspicious. Send all recordings to your private email and delete them from your phone. If you want to share your evidence with someone, make sure you can trust them. Sharing with mutual friends and family is not a good idea at this point. You might start feeling confident as you start collecting and documenting this evidence but avoid changing your behavior as it might arouse suspicion. Do not forget your goal. It is OK to take your time getting everything you need. If you think you may be the victim of abuse, please seek help from a Domestic Violence Advocate. If you are local (Fremont of Custer Counties) call us at 719-275-2429. Or you can call your local Crisis Center or the National Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

  • LEARN MORE ABOUT INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

    Can someone I really know, and love hurt me? Yes, it happens more frequently than it is talked about. It can start with something small as making insults towards to even physical sexual violence. Sometimes we want to see the best in those we love, so we wear these eye blinders. The problem with these blinders is that it completely hides what is taking place. Let’s take off those blinders and look at fives examples of what intimate partner violence looks like according to the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey with the CDC. Sexual violence includes rape, being made to penetrate someone else, sexual coercion, unwanted sexual contact, and non-contact unwanted sexual experiences. Contact sexual violence (SV) is a combined measure that includes rape, being made to penetrate someone else, sexual coercion, and/or unwanted sexual contact. Stalking victimization involves a pattern of harassing or threatening tactics used by a perpetrator that is both unwanted and causes fear or safety concerns in the victim. Physical violence includes a range of behaviors from slapping, pushing, or shoving to severe acts that include hit with a fist or something hard, kicked, hurt by pulling hair, slammed against something, tried to hurt by choking or suffocating, beaten, burned on purpose, used a knife or gun. Psychological aggression includes expressive aggression (such as name calling, insulting, or humiliating an intimate partner) and coercive control, which includes behaviors that are intended to monitor and control or threaten an intimate partner. Control of reproductive or sexual health includes the refusal by an intimate partner to use a condom. For a woman, it also includes times when a partner tried to get her pregnant when she did not want to become pregnant. For a man, it also includes times when a partner tried to get pregnant when the man did not want her to become pregnant. In NISVS, an intimate partner is described as a romantic or sexual partner and includes spouses, boyfriends, girlfriends, people with whom they dated, were seeing, or “hooked up.” All these examples are real life situations that so many people find themselves in and sometimes they don’t even know how they got to that place. But you are not alone in this. Our team at Family Crisis Services is ready to help you through this extremely difficult time. We also offer a 24/7 crisis hotline that you are welcome to call and speak to at 719-275-2429. No one deserves to be abused and not a single person should go through this alone either. We are ready to walk beside you through this. You are not what has been done to you. If you think you may be the victim of abuse, please seek help from a Domestic Violence Advocate. If you are local (Fremont of Custer Counties) call us at 719-275-2429. Or you can call your local Crisis Center or the National Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

  • WHY DO VICTIMS STAY WITH THEIR ABUSERS?

    It can be hard to understand why a victim would continue to stay with their abuser. Knowing the WHY behind this decision will help you be more supportive if someone you love is in a domestic violence situation and they are not choosing to leave. Keep in mind that on average, it takes a victim 7 exit attempts before they leave and never return. If you think you may be the victim of abuse, please seek help from a Domestic Violence Advocate. If you are local (Fremont of Custer Counties) call us at 719-275-2429. Or you can call your local Crisis Center or the National Hotline at 1-800-799-7233. These are common reasons victims stay with their abusers but keep in mind there are many more than what is listed here: FEAR - It is well-documented that victims are at the highest risk of injury when they are leaving. Increased threats of violence often convince a person to stay. An abuser often threatens to keep the children from the victim or threatens violence toward them. CONTROL - A victim might feel more control over the decision to stay in a relationship than to leave. They know what to expect from the abuser as far as their moods and how to behave in the least triggering way. Victims often fear (for good reason) that their abuser will lash out at friends or family if they leave. ISOLATION - An abuser often uses tactics to keep their partner away from family and friends. This leaves a victim without resources and a safe place, and, ultimately, without choices. FINANCES - Many victims lack the means to support themselves. Often an abuser will force a victim to quit their job or not allow them to work at all. Lack of access to household money is also an issue. The cost of leaving can be prohibitive when you consider kids, pets, transportation, housing, etc. PROMISES OF CHANGE - Abusers tend to make lots of promises of change and new behavior. They apologize and appear repentant, but that only lasts until the next violent outburst. LOVE - Love is usually present at the start of a relationship. Over time, as violence starts happening, the victim's feelings of love might not change. They might feel that with enough love, the abuser will change. And if there is a power dynamic in the relationship, the victim will feel responsible for the abuse and spend their time trying to "behave" to receive better treatment and be a better partner. If someone in your life says they are being abused, believe them. The best way to support them is to listen, partner with them in finding help, and respect the choices they make for themselves (even if you don't approve of their choices). If you think you may be the victim of abuse, please seek help from a Domestic Violence Advocate. If you are local (Fremont of Custer Counties) call us at 719-275-2429. Or you can call your local Crisis Center or the National Hotline at 1-800-799-7233.

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  • Family Crisis Services, Inc. | Canon City, CO

    Serving victims of domestic violence and sexual assault through advocacy, resources, and support Want to help? Your donations help us to provide services, resources and advocacy for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault. DONATE NOW do you Need help? CLICK HERE Our mission Family Crisis Services, Inc. is dedicated to promoting safety and justice for survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault through advocacy, support, and education. READ MORE Survivors Open Support Group Learn more about healing after an abusive relationship. Find the support you need to begin again. CLICK HERE FOR INFO Boundaries and Self-CareSupport Group Learn more about setting healthy boundaries and making self-care a part of your daily routine. CLICK HERE FOR INFO Give today to help survivors start fresh DONATE NOW!

  • Volunteer | FCSI

    VOLUNTEER WITH US At FCS, we serve victims of Domestic Violence and Assault through advocacy, services, and support. If you would like more information on getting involved, fill out the form below or email us at randi@familycrisisonline.org . Selected volunteer candidates will be invited to attend FCS's Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Training. APPLY TO VOLUNTEER

  • Contact | FCSI

    Home Our Mission Services Get Informed Support Us Volunteer Contact Blog More contact us Call us if you are in need of help or information. If you are in an emergency situation, call 911. Reach out for more information about support groups. 1-719-275-2429 PO Box 308 Canon City, CO 81215 randi@familycrisisonline.org CONTACT US First Name Last Name Email Phone Message Submit

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